Notices

Public Works Tenders 2019Public Meeting on Ottawa River Water Levels and Spring 2019 Flooding to be held on Saturday June 22, 2019Notice of Construction: HWY 148 CPR Overhead Bridge RemovalRequest for Proposal - Operational ReviewMedia Advisory - Algonquin Trail SurveyNotice of Application for Minor Variance File No. MV2019-01 and June 18, 2019 Public MeetingINFORMATION FOR LAURENTIAN VALLEY RESIDENTS ALONG THE OTTAWA RIVER - PROJECTED WATER LEVEL RATE OF DECREASE INFORMATION AS OF 5 PM JUNE 6, 2019Thank You! To All Who Assisted the Township with the 2019 Flooding EventFLOOD IMPACTED RESIDENTS AND PROPERTY OWNERS ARE REQUESTED TO REGISTER TO ASSIST THE TOWNSHIP WITH NEEDS ASSESSMENT FOR WHERE HELP IS REQUIRED WITH FLOOD CLEAN-UPOttawa River boating ban lifted on May 30 2019 by the Federal Minister of Transporation in sections near Laurentian Valley and other areasNotice of Application of Zoning By-law Amendment File No. Z2019-03 and Public Meeting of June 18, 2019News Release - IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR FLOOD IMPACTED RESIDENTS AND PROPERTY OWNERS ON REGISTRATION FOR ASSISTANCECleanup Kits from the Red Cross Available for Laurentian Valley Residents Impacted by FloodingAttention Business Owners! Sign up for our Business StudyVolunteer with the Township of Laurentian ValleyOpen Air & Recreational Fire Ban LiftedPUBLIC NOTICE - FLOOD 2019 UPDATEMNRF Flood Warning Extended for Pembroke District - Issued on May 9, 2019Community Improvement PlanImportant Press Release from the Ottawa River Regulating Committee Issued on May 3 2019Notice of Public Meeting - Proposed Building Permit Fees ChangesNews Release from County of Renfrew: Support Available for Residents Impacted by the FloodMedia Release - Laurentian Valley Flood UpdatePublic Notice - Ministry of Transportation Communication on Hazley Bay and Des Allumettes BridgesNotice that the Township of Laurentian Valley has declared an Emergency due to Flooding on April 27, 2019Renfrew County and District Health Unit Media Release on April 26, 2019 - Reminder to make sure your drinking water well is safe before using in flooded areasAvailability of Sandbags and Sand Supplies in Laurentian ValleyCatch the Ace Lottery Every Thursday in Laurentian Valley!Sandbagging TipsNotice of Application of Zoning By-law Amendment File No. Z2019-02 and Public Meeting of April 16, 2019Notice of April 2, 2019 Public Meeting for a Community Improvement Plan for the Township of Laurentian ValleyPetawawa, Pembroke and Laurentian Valley - Receiving Waste Collection Schedule SoonSpecial Council Meeting

Water Well Basics

A well gets its water from an underground source called groundwater. Ground water is a resource found under the earth’s surface. Most ground water comes from rain and melting snow soaking into the ground. Water fills the spaces between rocks and soils, making an “aquifer”. Ground water, its depth from the surface, quality for drinking water, and chance of being polluted, varies from area to area. Generally, the deeper the well, the better the ground water. The amount of new water flowing into the area also affects ground water quality.

Dug wells

Hacking at the ground with a pick and shovel is one way to dig a well. If the ground is soft and the water table is shallow,then dug wells can work. They are often lined with stones to prevent them from collapsing. They cannot be dug much deeper than the water table -- just as you cannot dig a hole very deep when you are at the beach... it keeps filling up with water!

Driven wells

Driven wells are still common today. They are built by driving a small-diameter pipe into soft earth, such as sand or gravel. A screen is usually attached to the bottom of the pipe to filter out sand and other particles. Problems? They can only tap shallow water, and because the source of the water is so close to the surface, contamination from surface pollutants can occur.

Drilled wells

Most modern wells are drilled, which requires a fairly complicated and expensive drill rig. Drill rigs are often mounted on big trucks. They use rotary drill bits that chew away at the rock, percussion bits that smash the rock, or, if the ground is soft,large auger bits. Drilled wells can be drilled more than 1,000 feet deep. Often a pump is placed at the bottom to push water up to the surface.